La Cacciatrice (Chiesa di Helena Bertinelli)

  • # 11 (Day 15) Helena Bertinelli meets Stephanie Brown, and they bond over what losers their fathers are

In the forerun that led up to No Man’s Land, Helena Bertinelli crashes into Stephanie Brown (literally) and the two of them soon bond over several commonalities, chiefly the fact that both their families are run by (or overran) by no good hoodlums.

Though Stephanie is initially taken aback by Helena’s methods (including how Helena wants to take out her father, and not necessarily for dinner), Steph does agree that Gotham needs a few more buttkickers who have a take charge attitude.

Despite how she channels her intensity into an excess of violence here, Helena does perform a few heroics to keep the civilians caught in the middle of the action here, safe (chiefly against the rampaging Monsoon).

Helena would later channel that intensity and learn to temper it, in order to help people in need during the saga that would immediately follow Cataclysm.

Sidenote: Given how much Steph and Helena have in common, I often wish they would have worked together more. Talk about a dream.

amurogay:

So, for part 13 of the Tim Drake Special Move Clinic, something a little different. As you can see, in this pic, Tim is NOT correctly performing his signature move. One foot for two different opponents? HERESY.
Fortunately, the ever-talented Helena Bertinelli is on hand to demonstrate the proper execution of the Double Drake Dropkick. That is, two feet, one opponent. And she gets him right in the face like a badass too.
If he hadn’t first used this move on King Snake back in the first Robin mini, I’d be willing to accept the theory that Helena taught him the move, since the above scene was in Robin: Cry of the Huntress, still before he gets his own ongoing. 

amurogay:

So, for part 13 of the Tim Drake Special Move Clinicsomething a little different. As you can see, in this pic, Tim is NOT correctly performing his signature move. One foot for two different opponents? HERESY.

Fortunately, the ever-talented Helena Bertinelli is on hand to demonstrate the proper execution of the Double Drake Dropkick. That is, two feet, one opponent. And she gets him right in the face like a badass too.

If he hadn’t first used this move on King Snake back in the first Robin mini, I’d be willing to accept the theory that Helena taught him the move, since the above scene was in Robin: Cry of the Huntress, still before he gets his own ongoing. 

# 12 (Day 14) A Helena scorned teams up with the Birds of Prey
Even if Barbara isn’t exactly enthused with the prospect of working with both Helena Bertinelli and Selina Kyle, she eventually comes around to becoming accepting of both, and eventually embraces Helena as a friend.
Though it doesn’t happen during this issue (which is Birds of Prey: Manhunt #1) it does plant a few seeds that will inevitably blossom into a fruitful relationship.
  • # 12 (Day 14) A Helena scorned teams up with the Birds of Prey

Even if Barbara isn’t exactly enthused with the prospect of working with both Helena Bertinelli and Selina Kyle, she eventually comes around to becoming accepting of both, and eventually embraces Helena as a friend.

Though it doesn’t happen during this issue (which is Birds of Prey: Manhunt #1) it does plant a few seeds that will inevitably blossom into a fruitful relationship.

# 13 (Day 13) Helena battles a plague and helps out the residents of Gotham
Even if Tim and Dick weren’t too happy to see her -



Helena plays an integral part in keeping Gotham safe during the Contagion story line.
What she learns during this epidemic would prove valuable in the long run, particularly when the city is hit by a devastating earthquake.
  • # 13 (Day 13) Helena battles a plague and helps out the residents of Gotham

Even if Tim and Dick weren’t too happy to see her -

image

Helena plays an integral part in keeping Gotham safe during the Contagion story line.

What she learns during this epidemic would prove valuable in the long run, particularly when the city is hit by a devastating earthquake.

helenawaynehuntress:

shobogan:

rambosaysso:

souljannoying:

Why does anybody even live in Gotham

Because Batman is hot.

because batwoman is hot

Because the likelihood of being rescued by the Huntress (Helena Wayne)—and thereby meeting her—on the Earth-2 version of Gotham is pretty damn high.

Even if I ended up dead in the process, the point is I still met Helena Wayne. I would at least die happy. :)

  • # 14 (Day 12) Helena confronts The Smiling Man, and comes to terms with her past

In the second volume of The Huntress series (Huntress V2, released in 1994) we find a very paranoid and off-kilter Helena, who is constantly torn between two personas. On the outside, she would appear to be a mousy school teacher. But deep within her lies a ferocious beast; a primeval wild woman, ready to spring and unleash all the fury hidden deep within the recesses of her soul.

The series finds her living alone, with the automated voices in her apartment complex, melding with the cacophony in her mind. She’s still haunted by the tragedy of her past, and she’s even willing to hold people hostage in pits in order to do the one thing that she feels will bring her peace. And that is: to get her revenge against Omerta, The Smiling Man, who not only took her family, but her innocence as well.

She eventually does so.

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(Though she’s not the one who ultimately does him in.)

After she feels that she has rectified a past wrong, she is finally able to lift the veil of shame from her, and puts on the black veil of morning in its place. Then she goes and visits her departed family.

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The existential crisis she experiences here is all too brief, as shortly after this, she resumes her role as The Huntress.

Even if I didn’t really appreciate how the story portrayed Helena as near one-dimensional in her craziness, I did like how Chuck Dixon added more aspects to Helena’s ever expanding canon (e.g. the audio recordings through her apartment building) and even more so than that, I did appreciate the artwork of Michael Netzer.

As someone else said, “[The] art is great.Kind of an angry, psychedelic Frank Miller vibe from Michael Netzer, who really should do another Batman comic if he ever finds the time. I’ll agree the storyline is pretty forgettable though.”

And Netzer himself seems to agree with this statement.

Overall, even if aspects of the story make me cringe, I still feel that the mini-series was an important read, due to its significance in Helena Bertinelli’s timeline.